Creating a Better World Order Through Families and Inclusive Societies

family day“If tolerance, respect and equity permeate family life, they will translate into values that shape societies, nations and the world.” – Kofi Annan

Family is the microcosm of the global community. The role families play in forming healthy and peaceful communities is remarkable, which is why the United Nations commemorates the International Day of Families as a day to celebrate the peace, love and harmony that trickles down from a family to the community. It offers an opportunity to spread awareness about different issues concerning families, including social, demographic and economic processes.

Objectives of Celebrating International Day of Families

● To promote better standards of living and social upliftment of families worldwide.
● To acknowledge the essence of people, families, societies, and cultures.
● To encourage the role of families as agents of change and progress.
● To spread awareness on issues affecting families across the world.
● To sensitize people on issues that relate to families, and promoting appropriate action.

Theme of 2018: Families and Inclusive Societies

An ideal family is where people respect and love each other, and fulfill each other’s emotional and physical needs. We should all play our parts as members of a global family, and help each other through kindness and tolerance. The first step towards achieving this is ‘inclusion’. Without inclusion, a society is fragmented, and its growth stunted.

The Ponty Chadha Foundation, through its various initiatives, works towards creating healthier families and more inclusive societies. Here’s how:

Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan: As a special education charitable school, MBCN aims to do away with taboos associated with people having disabilities. Through various awareness programmes, we spread the message of creating an equitable environment for everyone – a world where no person feels threatened or discriminated against. We focus on offering opportunities to the specially-abled that allow them to showcase their talent and become active members of our society.

Sardar Kulwant Singh Chadha Skills Academy: Working towards empowering the underprivileged youth, our Skills Academy imparts various employable skills, and helps them get jobs. We strongly believe that making the youth financially independent uplifts their entire family, and raises their standard of life.

Health Camps: A community cannot flourish if it’s not healthy. PCF-organised health camps in rural areas ensure that basic healthcare reaches the underserved. Likewise, free medical services are offered on a regular basis in association with health workers from Dr. Ram Saran Garg Indo-German Hospital.

Food Distribution Camps: Our sole aim of organising food distribution drives is to fight hunger and provide for the nutritional needs of the less-privileged. Bringing food and smiles to these children is what keeps us going!

The onus of creating a peaceful and inclusive world rests on all of us. Let’s do it together!

Source: Ponty Chadha website

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World Laughter Day-Through the eyes of PCF

PCF Laughter dayLaughing is, and will always be, the best form of therapy.”- Audrey Hepburn

Have you ever wondered what laughing does to our body? It not only brings people together but it also stimulates healthy physical and emotional changes in our body. Sharing laughter is one of the most effective tools to develop everlasting bonds, and this is the sole reason why World Laughter Dayis observed throughout the world. People from all walks of life celebrate this day with full vigor and enthusiasm. After all, who doesn’t want to be happy!

We, at The Ponty Chadha Foundation firmly believe that spreading happiness and laughter is just a tiny step that makes a huge difference.

Since we feel so passionately about spreading happiness in our society, we have taken many initiatives to spread waves of mirth and joy all around.

1. Fun-filled therapies for kids with special needs

laughter 1At MBCN, we believe in the happiness of our children and to achieve this, our teachers are always up to go an extra mile in creating an environment, which brims with positivity and laughter. How do we do this? We spread joy through our fun-filled therapies for our kids with special needs.

2. Joy of giving: food/health drink distribution

laughter 4We also believe that the joy of giving is the greatest joy indeed.To contribute to this, we often carry out food/health drink distribution. The mere sight of people’s laughter after getting one glass of some sweet, refreshing drink brings smiles on our faces, and at the end of the day, the glass is always HALF- FULL of happiness.

 3. Regular health camps in the rural sections 

laughter 2Conducting health camps are also an essential part of The Ponty Chadha Foundation. With the support of our esteemed team of doctors, we organise regular health camps in the rural sections of Delhi/NCR, including our workers at Wave city. In this way, we our doing our bit to uplift the needy and contribute to their happiness.

4. Skills and experience to the underprivileged youth

laughter 3The Sardar Kulwant Singh Chadha Skills Academy, since its inception has strived to impart appropriate skills and experience to the underprivileged youth in our country. It has not only helped them become independent, but has also supported them and their families to lead better and happier lives.

A smile is an instant gratification for all the efforts that we put in our endeavours. It’s like fuel that facilitates our ongoing journey for a happy society & we have no intentions of putting a halt to this beautiful journey.

We hope that after you finishing reading this, laughter and joy finds a way into your life. Happy world laughter day!

Source: http://www.thepontychadhafoundation.org/blog/inspiration/world-laughter-day-through-the-eyes-of-pcf/

Unemployment on the Rise in India: The Problem, Causes, and Solutions

Unemployment on the Rise in IndiaIndia recently reclaimed the tag of “world’s fastest growing economy” from China. With a GDP growth rate of 7.2% in 3rd quarter of FY 2017, India has surpassed every other developing or developed economy by a huge margin. Though it sends a positive message throughout the economy, there is one index on which India’s performance is continuously worsening; that is unemployment. India’s rate of employment has declined steeply, and job creation has not been at par with working-age population.

According to a recent report from Labour Bureau, an attached office under Ministry of Labour and Employment, India has the largest unemployed population in the world. In the inclusive growth index, we are at number 60, far behind our neighbours. (Source: Outlook) 
65% of the Indian population has an average age of less than 35 years. Such a large young population could be our strength if put to employment, which is unfortunately not the case. The unemployment rate in India hit its highest level in March at 6.23%, according to the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE), an independent think-tank. Clearly, the situation is quite distressing.
While we are discussing the declining employment rates, it is also imperative that we discuss its underlying causes as well.

Here are some major factors that are contributing to the rising unemployment in India:
● Alarming growth rate of population
● Ever increasing income inequality
● Lack of technical qualification
● Dependency on underdeveloped agriculture sector
● Reliance on temporary jobs

Solutions, so far Indian government is making efforts to correct the alarming situation of youth unemployment. Various schemes and initiatives like Skill India, Make in India, Prime Minister’s Employment Generation Programme (PMGEP), Pradhan Mantri Rojgar Protsahan Yojana, and Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana are just some steps taken by government aimed at redressing the current situation. Many Indian corporate houses and conglomerates are also taking charge and doing their bit to team up with these government initiatives and salvage the problem of unemployment in India.

Sardar Kulwant Singh Chadha Skills Academy – a Wave group initiative

Big corporate houses like The Wave Group are planning their CSR activities with a motive to engage youth in skill development activities and train them in employable skills. The Ponty Chadha Foundation has set up Sardar Kulwant Singh Chadha Academy, a world-class skills development academy. Located in Ghaziabad, this institute has a capacity of 120 to 150 students per programme. Keeping in mind the current demand of market, this academy imparts training in security services, facilities management, firefighting and real estate.

Clearly, the only solution to fight unemployment is that government works towards creating jobs and corporates lend a helping hand in training the workforce.

Also, while skill development is crucial, these initiatives should be supplemented by more comprehensive programmes and favourable policies that target the most vulnerable and disadvantaged youth.

Source: http://www.thepontychadhafoundation.org/blog/employment/unemployment-on-the-rise-in-india-the-problem-causes-and-solutions/

Earth Hour: Let’s Embrace The Darkness for an Hour To Light Up The Ages

earth hour

In 2007, what started as a simple “lights-off” movement in Sydney has grown dramatically and made its way to more than 180 countries today. Over the years, Earth hour has come a long way. For the uninitiated ones, Earth Hour is an annual event which encourages people across the globe to turn off lights for one hour in their homes, offices and buildings, as a symbolic act of taking better care of this planet. The organisation behind this brilliant idea and event is World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

Earth Hour 2017 saw cities with famous landmarks and monuments from around the world such as the U.N headquarters in New York, Big Ben in London, the Eiffel Tower, Sydney’s famous Opera House and others dimming their lights as a symbol of unity for this event. We expect to see the same level of zeal and enthusiasm this year as well.

When is it being celebrated?

This year it is being observed on 24 March 2018 from 8:30 pm to 9:30 pm.

Why is Earth Hour important?

Today, global warming and climate change are not just words related to some scientific research paper. Both have emerged as a real threat to our planet. With the ever rising population, number of cars on the road and carbon footprints throughout the ecosystem, the initiatives like Earth Hour are exactly what we need today.

We as human beings have been affecting our ecosystem and putting ourselves as well as other species at a great risk. Though the industries are the bigger culprits in this case, and international treaties like the Paris Agreement is doing its job in putting a leash on them, we too are responsible citizens who must come forward in order to save our planet.

With Earth Hour, the WWF aims to engage people across the globe to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle. Turning off lights for an hour is just a reminder of the fact that if we do not change how we consume our resources, the dark age is not very far. 2016 was recorded as the hottest year for the third year in a row, which signals towards the ever-increasing impact of global warming. Keeping this in mind, WWF is taking Earth Hour even further by encouraging people to cut on fuel, food wastage, plastic usage, etc.

How can I contribute to Earth Hour every day?

• Commute by public transport and cycle as much as possible.
• Turn off the lights and other appliances whenever not in use.
• Switch to solar energy and sustainable LED bulbs.
• Recycle paper and plastic bags as many times as possible.
• Reduce food wastage. Buy consciously.
• Talk about Earth Hour on social media and spread the importance of this message

Everything mentioned above is just a speck of the action that we all need to take if we want to pass on a healthy planet to our future generations. This Earth Hour, let us all take a pledge to do our best to make this edition an even bigger success than it has been in earlier years. It’s time to deliver the action needed to protect the planet.

Ponty Chadha Website

Raising Awareness on World Down Syndrome Day and Beyond

downsyndrome

Down syndrome is one of the most common chromosome abnormalities in humans, found in one out of every 1000 newborns each year. However, the society, including most of the parents of babies with Down syndrome, has so much to learn about this, especially in developing countries like India.

Keeping this in mind, World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD) was first observed in 2006 in many countries around the world. Acknowledging this, the United Nations General Assembly declared 21 March as World Down Syndrome Day – the 21st day of the third month; to signify the triplication of the 21st chromosome that causes Down syndrome. Here, we are trying to simplify the disorder so that everyone knows and understands the fact that children with this condition are not sick or suffering; they just have one extra chromosome.

What is Down syndrome?
To put it simply, Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) is a chromosomal abnormality where a child is born with three copies of the 21st chromosome (as shown in the picture).

When babies are being developed, they receive 23 chromosomes from their mother contained in her egg and 23 chromosomes from their father contained in his sperm, totalling 46 chromosomes. Children with Down syndrome are born with an extra 21st chromosome.

what-is-down-syndrome1 (2)

Characteristics of children with Down syndrome:
While the effect of this disorder may differ from child to child, most of the affected ones are observed with the following physical characteristics:
● Flat facial features
● Small head and ears
● Short neck
● Bulging tongue
● Upward slanted eyes
● Atypically shaped ears
● Poor muscle tone

Children with Down syndrome usually have some degree of developmental disability, but it’s often mild to moderate. If not paid attention to, the children might show behavioural properties like:
● Impulsive behaviour
● Poor judgment
● Short attention span
● Slow learning capabilities

How to raise a kid with Down syndrome:
First thing a parent should do is learn as much as possible about the condition. After that, one can look for help at other support groups, talk to therapists and get in contact with other parents who have already been through this. Apart from this, here are few things that might help such parents:
● Give your child chores around the house. Just break them up into small steps and be patient
● Have your child play with other kids who do and don’t have Down syndrome
● Keep your expectations high as your child tries and learns new things
● Make time to play, read, have fun, and go out together
● Avoid saying “That’s wrong” to correct mistakes. Instead, say, “Try it again”
● As you work with doctors, therapists, and teachers, focus on your child’s needs rather than on the condition
● Look at what your child is learning at school and see if you can work those lessons into your home life

While all these tips will certainly help your children in the longer run, one thing they need the most from you is love. Kids with Down syndrome need and deserve as much love as other kids.

Contributing towards making the society more understanding towards children with special needs like in the case of Down syndrome, The Ponty Chadha Foundation runs Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan, a school for specially-abled kids. MBCN makes sure that these children get a holistic learning experience and a supportive environment, empowering them to achieve maximum independence while defeating their conditions.

On this World Down Syndrome Day, let us all take a pledge to create a society that is more supportive and loving towards the children with special needs.

Zero Discrimination Day: Doing More than Just Spreading a Message

Zero discrimination day

March 1 of every year is observed as Zero Discrimination Day round the globe to celebrate and promote equal rights of people with different nationalities, castes, genders, religions, beliefs, races etc. It was first celebrated on March 1, 2014, particularly observed by UNAIDS, a UN organization that fights discrimination against people living with AIDS. It was, later on, observed as a day to unite people against every other kind of discrimination to strengthen the sentiment that everybody counts.

It is quite unfortunate that even in India, whose independence war started as a battle against the extremely racist British regime, discrimination and prejudice are still quite common and prevalent. Such unfair and ill-founded is this discrimination that it does not let even the differently-abled people live with dignity. Discrimination is not just denying a specific right to someone but an action as common as giving a lingering look to tourists, colored people, people on wheelchair, and the list goes on. It is making them feel that they are incomplete in some way.

In such a situation, what we need is an initiative that not only stands against the issue but empowers the concerned people as well. That is exactly the motto of The Ponty Chadha Foundation (PCF). The organization, through Kulwant Singh Chadha Skills Academy, provides equal learning opportunities to the underprivileged Indian youth, no matter what their caste, religion or background is. So far, thousands of young people have been employed and are making the most of their lives. The academy maintains a commendable teacher-student ratio of 1:30 so that each student gets equal and ample attention of the teachers and trainers. The curriculum encompasses almost every employability skills ranging from soft skills training to computer literacy.

PCF is also dedicated towards making quality healthcare accessible to the needy through its regular free diagnostic health camps for village communities. Thousands of patients who are underprivileged have benefitted from these camps, which certainly encourage us to do more and better for them.

The Ponty Chadha Foundation’s another applaudable initiative, Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan (MBCN), is a charitable school for children with special needs and abilities. The idea behind MBCN is not only to educate, but also make these children ready for the competitive world and give them a chance to claim all they deserve.

PCF also firmly believes in food security for every human being. Keeping this idea as the founding stone, the organization has partnered with the India Food Banking Network (IFBN) to organize involuntary food distribution drives to donate essential food grains such as rice and wheat and high energy biscuits and cookies to the underprivileged communities in Noida and Ghaziabad.

The Ponty Chadha Foundation is just one step in the right direction. We, as a nation and society, must come together to eradicate discrimination of all types, from all lives. This Zero Discrimination Day, let us all take a pledge to treat everyone equally and respect unconditionally.

Let there be light this International Book Giving Day

International-Book-Giving-Day

“You cannot open a book without learning something.” – Confucius

Eating, shopping, exercising and what not, times have changed the ways we do most of our daily activities. The role of books in our lives remains undiminished, nevertheless. A trustworthy guide and a fun companion, books can play a myriad of parts in an individual’s life. Besides building minds, they are the shapers of the society.

In order to make sure that no child is deprived of the nourishment of reading, 14th February is celebrated worldwide as the International Book Giving Day. The aim was to have the written word reach out to even those who are not fortunate enough to access them. A symbolic day, it’s a great occasion to promote the necessity of books in one’s life.

Although it’s celebrated just one day, the season of books lasts all year long. With the right amount of push and encouragement, the healthy habit of reading can be garnered in a child. Most of us consider textbooks as the only books apt for children. The fact, however, is that the more one reads, the more one learns and grows.

When it comes to inculcating the enthusiasm for books in children, some of us get bogged down by their fleeting attention spans. The code is to not force a book on a child. From what theory and practice have taught us, children learn faster when they are constantly exposed to something. The idea is to raise children in a space surrounded by books. Plus, the more they see their parents or grown ups read, the more their intrigue will be piqued. The key, therefore, is to lead by example and steady exposure to books.

Another important aspect of the day lies in advocating the access to books. In our country, a child who has never got to lay his/her hands on a book isn’t a rarity. The spirit of International Book Giving Day is incomplete without attempting to make books universal. Therefore, let’s participate in this grand cause with full enthusiasm and make someone’s life rich with books and learning.